Excision - Gallery & Ticket Booth

EXCISION

TUTOR: ANDREA MINA & PETER ZELLNER RMIT - INTERIOR DESIGN Excision looks at what is possible through removing rather than adding. Through a series of excisions to transform our perceptions and experience of an existing space. Through removal, the space can be charged with a potential beyond its original purpose. The site for this surgical act was the decommissioned Spencer Street Power Station. The scope of this project is the old boiler house, office and engine room. The structure of the building is a dark vast steel framed shed that is packed with machines, steel framing and partition walls. Using removal, the underlaying open spaces are revealed. A circulation axis through the space was cut along an axis linking the Main Turbine Hall and the lane to the Heritage Victoria listed cast iron water tank.
Excision - Context
Excision - Courtyard Facade
Excision - Turbine Hall
Excision - Service Lift
Excision - Existing conditions History of the site: The Water Tank The water tank, installed in 1927, was the first of only two cities outside England to do so. It was part of a hydraulic system that used the pressurized water to operate lifts in the CBD and the organ at the State and Regent Theaters. A lane way between two of the old buildings houses the tank, an elevated cast-iron structure.
Excision - Approach to the Cast Iron Water Tank The power station was decommissioned in 1982, as there was more efficient power generation available in the Latrobe Valley and there it sat until its destruction in 2007. In 2000, Herzog & de Meuron completed their conversion of London’s Bankside Power Station into the Tate Modern, putting aside the cost of decontaminating the site, I still wonder what might have been if Melbourne had not demolished this power station and sought to rehabilitate the site and adapt the main buildings?

PROJECTS

Excision - Gallery & Ticket Booth
TUTOR: ANDREA MINA & PETER ZELLNER RMIT - INTERIOR DESIGN Excision looks at what is possible through removing rather than adding. Through a series of excisions to transform our perceptions and experience of an existing space. Through removal, the space can be charged with a potential beyond its original purpose. The site for this surgical act was the decommissioned Spencer Street Power Station. The scope of this project is the old boiler house, office and engine room. The structure of the building is a dark vast steel framed shed that is packed with machines, steel framing and partition walls. Using removal, the underlaying open spaces are revealed. A circulation axis through the space was cut along an axis linking the Main Turbine Hall and the lane to the Heritage Victoria listed cast iron water tank. Excision - Context Excision - Courtyard Facade
Excision - Turbine Hall
Excision - Service Lift
Excision - Existing conditions History of the site: The Water Tank The water tank, installed in 1927, was the first of only two cities outside England to do so. It was part of a hydraulic system that used the pressurized water to operate lifts in the CBD and the organ at the State and Regent Theaters. A lane way between two of the old buildings houses the tank, an elevated cast-iron structure.
Excision - Approach to the Cast Iron Water Tank The power station was decommissioned in 1982, as there was more efficient power generation available in the Latrobe Valley and there it sat until its destruction in 2007. In 2000, Herzog & de Meuron completed their conversion of London’s Bankside Power Station into the Tate Modern, putting aside the cost of decontaminating the site, I still wonder what might have been if Melbourne had not demolished this power station and sought to rehabilitate the site and adapt the main buildings?

PROJECTS

Excision - Gallery & Ticket Booth
TUTOR: ANDREA MINA & PETER ZELLNER RMIT - INTERIOR DESIGN Excision looks at what is possible through removing rather than adding. Through a series of excisions to transform our perceptions and experience of an existing space. Through removal, the space can be charged with a potential beyond its original purpose. The site for this surgical act was the decommissioned Spencer Street Power Station. The scope of this project is the old boiler house, office and engine room. The structure of the building is a dark vast steel framed shed that is packed with machines, steel framing and partition walls. Using removal, the underlaying open spaces are revealed. A circulation axis through the space was cut along an axis linking the Main Turbine Hall and the lane to the Heritage Victoria listed cast iron water tank.
Excision - Context
Excision - Existing conditions
Excision - Courtyard Facade
Excision - Turbine Hall
Excision - Service Lift History of the site: The Water Tank The water tank, installed in 1927, was the first of only two cities outside England to do so. It was part of a hydraulic system that used the pressurized water to operate lifts in the CBD and the organ at the State and Regent Theaters. A lane way between two of the old buildings houses the tank, an elevated cast-iron structure.
Excision - Approach to the Cast Iron Water Tank The power station was decommissioned in 1982, as there was more efficient power generation available in the Latrobe Valley and there it sat until its destruction in 2007. In 2000, Herzog & de Meuron completed their conversion of London’s Bankside Power Station into the Tate Modern, putting aside the cost of decontaminating the site, I still wonder what might have been if Melbourne had not demolished this power station and sought to rehabilitate the site and adapt the main buildings?

PROJECTS